The Dirt on the Farm

By |2018-10-25T10:41:27+00:00October 11th, 2018|Happenings|

The plants are growing, the fields are buzzing with bees. Spring is in full swing as we enter the lush Beltane season on Oshala Farms.

Over 400,000 babies but who’s counting?

The greenhouse is now busting with thriving plants that we will continue to transplant out in the fields over the next month (as long as the weather co-operates). Along with the medicinals, we have a variety of vegetables. We transplanted lettuces and kales the last couple of weeks for farmer’s markets, restaurants and grocery stores nearby.

Always growing, always learning.

It was a pleasure to be part of the teaching team at the first Medicinal Herb Growers & Marketers Conference in WA this last month. We were able to share our knowledge and get inspired from others from across the nation with the same passion of increasing the domestic medicinal herb supply with quality product.

PICK OF THE SEASON: The amazing artichoke, not just good for eating….

This perennial thistle is going off on the farm right now and we are loving it! Artichokes have been used for food and medicine for centuries. It was traditionally used as a diuretic and liver tonic. If you’re enjoying the season as much as we are, think about saving the water after you cook your chokes. You can drink it as tea or save it for stock. The leaf, stem and root are used to make extracts. We use artichoke extract in our digestive bitter formula.

Order Your Herbs

Jeff and Elise

Oshala Farm herbs and spices are crafted in harmony in the Applegate Valley of Southern Oregon and nourished with pristine water, air and soil. By choosing our products you are supporting an Earth-centric business that is striving to make a difference on our planet. Thank you.

Enjoy in Good Health,
Elise and Jeff Higley

NOW AVAILABLE: Heritage chicken eggs

Oshala Farm has recently been gifted a flock of heritage laying hens and The Egg Mobile from our neighbors Triple Gem Refuge – a tiny house worthy of living in ourselves at Oshala Farm. It even has its own rain water catchment system! This tiny house on wheels, housing 50 heritage chickens is now being integrated into our fertility management plan on our fallow acreage this year. The design of the Egg Mobile allows the flock the freedom to move inside and out at will. The floor of the Egg Mobile is made primarily of chicken wire allowing the poop to fall and fertilize the fields as it is moved.

To be clear, this is not a confinement tractor. Our birds roam free in just over five acres while the land gets rejuvenated to plant in the future and we need less fertilizer from outside the farm, which is better for the environment. Plus we are able to sell these beautiful eggs with our community to pay for their feed. We know “you are what our animals eat,” so these birds not only graze high protein bugs and medicinal plants in the field but are fed the best organic feed which we ferment for them each day. Currently the flock is feeding on oats, borage and bugs (yum).

We are excited to be part of a revolution on Oshala Farm. The industrialization of agriculture has consolidated and specialized the once decentralized and integrated production of poultry into a uniform system of mass production. Climate-controlled confinement and housing, chemical additives and heavy grain feeding have allowed poultry breeders to ignore adaptation and other survival characteristics in favor of maximized production. Poultry that has been intensely bred for certain characteristics result in genetic uniformity. This restricts a population’s ability to adapt to changing conditions, making it vulnerable, for example, to be wiped out by a disease outbreak. Industrial stocks are unlikely to be able to adapt to environmental changes. Hence, diversity is essential for long-term food security.

Conservation of breed diversity within species has actively been pursued in the cultivation of the ‘gem’ flock. They’ve been raised lovingly on open-pasture and supplemented exclusively with organic non-GMO feed. The diversity of the flock is further reflected in the various shapes and colors of the eggs. Dark brown eggs from the Maran, pinkish eggs from the Orpington, light brown from the Dominic, and various shades of blue from the Araucana and Ameracauna demonstrate beautifully the diversity of the flock.

Oshala Farm is committed to continuing the breeding and raising of heritage chickens. This dedication takes time and effort which is reflected in the cost of a dozen eggs. Our price reflects the true price of environmental stewardship. If you are interested in joining our egg CSA, please contact us at 541-846-1120.

Email [email protected] or call (541) 846-1120 with your order.

Oshala Farm herbs and spices are crafted in harmony in the Applegate Valley of Southern Oregon and nourished with pristine water, air and soil. By choosing our products you are supporting an Earth-centric business that is striving to make a difference on our planet. Thank you.

Enjoy in Good Health,
Elise and Jeff Higley